SPEAKERS

Find out who you can discuss the latest updates and results with on the spot and where they are from…

Transplantation

 

…obtained her PhD in Genetics and Microbiology from the University of Vienna. She is working as Associated Professor of Immunology at the Department of Surgery at the Medical University of Vienna.
She has 15 years of experience in the field of organ transplantation and leads her own research group working on Treg induced transplantation tolerance.

Nina is currently holding chair of the Basic Science Committee of the European Society of Organ Transplantation (ESOT) and is board member of The Austrian Society for Surgical Research.

 

Meet her in the session “Treg therapies for tolerance induction

Hörsaal F – Plenary Hall
Thursday, 8. September, 10:30 – 12:00 CEST

Tumor Immunology

 

…concentrates his research on signaling processes in the immune system, both normal and when deregulated due to disease.

With his research group, he investigates how normal immune cells recognize pathogens and initiate immune defense. The group is also examining how pathologically deregulated signals in blood cells lead to the development of cancer. The goal of their research is to provide a basis for therapeutic manipulation of the immune system.
Jürgen Ruland studied medicine in Giessen and Pittsburgh with a degree in pharmacology. After medical and research work at TUM, Freiburg University, the Ontario Cancer Institute and the AMGEN Research Institute at the University of Toronto, he became head of a junior research group of the German Cancer Aid at TUM in 2003. He completed his postdoctoral studies in medicine in 2005 and served as professor of molecular immunology at TUM from 2010 to 2012. In 2012, he was appointed professor of clinical chemistry at TUM.

He is member of the National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the German Cancer Aid committee for promoting young medical professionals and scientists. He is the spokesperson for the Collaborative Research Center 1335 “Aberrant Immune Signals in Cancer” and successfully raised his second ERC Advanced Grant in 2019. In 2021 he received the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize from the German Research Foundation

 

Meet him in the session “Immune Receptor Signals in T Cell Malignancy

Hörsaal A
Thursday, 8. September, 10:30 – 12:00 CEST

Innate Immunity

 

…is a Full Professor for Microbiology and Immunology at Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and a Senior Group Leader at the German Rheumatism Research Centre, an Institute of the Leibniz Association.

His laboratory studies development and function of the innate immune system, in particular of innate lymphoid cells (ILC). A current focus is to obtain a molecular understanding of how the innate immune system, by integrating environmental signals, contributes to tissue physiology. Recent studies have revealed ever more intriguing relationships between innate immune system components and basic developmental and biologic processes that are likely to reveal unsuspected pathways by which the immune system might be plumbed to improve health and healthspan. These lines of research have suggested new functions of the immune system for processes such as tissue homeostasis, tissue resilience, metabolism, regeneration and growth.
Over the past 20 years my lab has contributed to some key aspects of the developmental origin and function of ILC and to how their function is informed by signals from the environment (microbiota, nutrients) (Sanos, Nat Immunol 2009; Vonarbourg, Immunity 2010; Kiss, Science 2011). Our work on the function of ILC has revealed new paradigms for roles of innate immune system components in protecting epithelial stem cells against environmental assaults (Hernandez, Nat Immunol 2015; Gronke, Nature 2019) and in controlling nutrient absorption (Guendel, Immunity 2020). We have demonstrated that all ILC are derived from a common progenitor, CHILP (Klose, Cell 2014). Our data have further defined a developmental trajectory for ILC and have elucidated some of the underlying transcriptional modules (Vonarbourg, Immunity 2010; Hoyler, Immunity 2012; Klose, Nature 2013). By virtue of their tissue-residency, ILC are involved in processes that are not conventionally linked to the immune system such as tissue repair and growth, differentiation of epithelial cells, morphogenesis and organ homeostasis. The role of ILC as sensors for various infractions to homeostasis and their ever more intriguing roles in regulating metabolism, resilience of tissues, epithelial differentiation, and epithelial integrity are a focus of our current research. We propose that ILC are an important hub in various homeostatic control circuits thereby contributing to successful adaptation to our habitats (Diefenbach, Immunity 2020).
Finally, we have provided several lines of evidence that the microbiota calibrates systemic immunity (Ganal, Immunity 2012). Our data identified tonic and tunable cytokine signals (type I interferons, IFN-I) controlled by the intestinal microbiota that regulate metabolic programs in mononuclear phagocytes that we linked to their ability to prime innate and adaptive immunity (Schaupp, Cell 2020). We hypothesize that in a genetically and microbiota diverse population, the availability of such signals is individually different leading to the calibration of distinct set-points for immune responsiveness which may be linked to the onset of inflammatory diseases.

 

Meet him in the session “Innate Lymphoid Cells

Hörsaal D
Thursday, 8. September, 10:30 – 12:00 CEST

Immunological Research in Allergy

…has gained Board certifications in Dermatology and Allergy and has been certified by the DGfI as “Fachimmunologe”. He has been Head of the Research-Division of Immunodermatology and Allergy Research (Full Professorship) and has in addition been Deputy Director of the clinical Department of Dermatology and Allergy at Hannover Medical School since 2008.
Thomas Werfel´s research interests focus on chronic inflammatory skin diseases including atopic dermatitis (role of allergens, microbial antigens and autoantigens, immunological mechanism, new therapeutical approaches). He has continuously received research grants from the German Research Council (DFG) and from various research foundations and received several awards for his work in skin inflammation research.

He is board member of the “Cluster of Excellence” RESIST funded by the DFG and focussing on susceptibility factors for infection in chronic diseases such as atopic dermatitis.
He has been “Fachkollegiat” (expert reviewer) in the section Inflammation/Medicine of the German Research Council (DFG) between 2012 and 2020, is board member of the German Society of Dermatology (DDG), and currently serves as Vice-President (“Past President”) of the German Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI).

He has been coordinator of the last three editions of German Guideline on Atopic Dermatitis and is co-author of the EDF guideline on Atopic Dermatitis. Moreover, he currently serves as Editor-in Chief of “Allergologie” and “Allergologie-select”.

 

 

Meet him in the session “Atopic dermatitis – a model disease of type 2 polarized inflammation in men

Hörsaal F – Plenary Hall
Friday, 9. September, 10:30 – 12:00 CEST

Imaging and priming of immune responses


T-cell antigen recognition via the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) is central to protection against pathogens and the emergence of neoplasms. If dysregulated, patients are prone to succumb to infections, cancer or suffer from autoimmunity. Despite extensive research efforts our current mechanistic understanding of T-cell antigen recognition remains still too limited to turn many rational approaches into effective therapies. Necessary change begins with quantitative, highly resolved and proven concepts of how T-cell antigen recognition operates on a molecular and (sub-) cellular level.

This is why Johannes Huppa and his team in Vienna combine innovative and quantitative molecular imaging modalities with synthetic and systems biology to ultimately clear the path for novel diagnostics and more effective treatments of cancer, autoimmunity, infectious diseases, the preservation of organ transplants and the protection form graft-versus-host disease.

Johannes Huppa is a molecular immunologist who studied biochemistry at the Free University of Berlin (1989-93). For his PhD thesis he relocated to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1993-1997) and Harvard Medical School (Boston, 1997-1998), where he analyzed the biogenesis and ER-quality control of the TCR-CD3 complex. As a postdoc and Research Associate at Stanford University (1999-2011) he demonstrated that T-cells signal through their TCRs over many hours and that such prolonged signaling promotes the full effector T-cell potential. He also developed advanced imaging modalities to visualize and quantitate T-cell antigen recognition at the molecular level within the immunological synapse. Following his move back to Europe (2011) and as current faculty at the Medical University of Vienna, Dr. Huppa aims to apply his specific expertise in areas of clinical relevance.

 

 

Meet him in the session “How T-Cells Recognize Antigens in Health and Disease – a Molecular Imaging Approach

Hörsaal A
Friday, 9. September, 10:30 – 12:00 CEST

 

The Uderhardt lab uses cutting-edge bioimaging to resolve tissue-level mechanisms of regulation of inflammation. Our main focus is on the tissue-protective function resident tissue macrophages, their interplay with stromal networks and immune effector cells, such as neutrophils.

 

 

Meet him in the session “A tissue-level perspective on inflammation and homeostasis

Hörsaal A
Friday, 9. September, 10:30 – 12:00 CEST

Autoimmune Disorders


…was full professor for neurology and neuroimmunology at the University Zürich and headed the Neuroimmunology and Multiple Sclerosis Research Section and MS outpatient clinic at the University Hospital Zurich until July 2022. R. Martin trained in medicine and specialized in neurology at the University Würzburg. He pursued post-doctoral fellowships in immunology, virology and neuroimmunology in Würzburg and at the Neuroimmunology Branch, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, USA, where he worked as tenured senior investigator until 2005. Subsequently, he held full professorships in Barcelona (Vall D´Hebron University Hospital), Hamburg (Director of the Institute for Neuroimmunology and Clinical MS Research, University Hamburg) and now in Zurich. The main interests of his group are disease mechanisms of multiple sclerosis (MS) with particlar focus on T cell recognition and the role of the HLA-DR15 haplotype in MS, B- T cell interactions, disease mechanisms of JC polyoma virus-mediated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and developing novel treatments for MS and PML besides providing care for MS patients in one of the largest MS centers in Switzerland.

He has published over 420 scientific articles and filed numerous patents in the above areas. He and his group developed more than 10 projects from idea to early clinical proof-of-concept trials. He was a member of the Kuratorium of the Jung Foundation for Science, Hamburg and he is part of the core faculty of the Wyss Translational Center Zurich, a cofounder of the Drug Discovery Network Zurich (DDNZ), a cofounder of the Therapy Development Accelerator (TDA) at the University Zurich, and a cofounder and co-owner of Cellerys AG, a startup company specializing in tolerance induction.

 

 

Meet him in the session “The role of the HLA-DR15 haplotype in the autoimmune pathogensis of multiple sclerosis

Hörsaal D
Friday, 9. September, 10:30 – 12:00 CEST



… is Professor of Immunobiology and head of the Institute of Immunology at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria. He studied biochemistry at the University of Vienna, carried out his doctoral thesis at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP Vienna) and performed postdoctoral studies at the Skirball Institute (NYU Medical Center) in New York. His long-term research interests focus on the characterization of molecular mechanisms that regulate the development, differentiation and effector function of T lymphocytes.

With his studies he aims to address fundamental basic research questions as well as to provide medical-relevant insight into the regulation of T cell-mediated immunity. He received several prizes including the START program award for highly-qualified young scientists from the Austrian Science Fund. He is a corresponding member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and a board member of the Austrian Science Fund.

He also has a strong interest in science policy and served from 2020-2021 as President of the Biomedical Alliance in Europe.

 

 

Meet him in the session “Histone deacetylases and the control of CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity

Hörsaal D
Friday, 9. September, 10:30 – 12:00 CEST

Microbiome and Metabolism


… is a British/Swiss scientist who trained in Cambridge, London, Hamilton (Onatario) and Bern before joining the ETH Zürich.

She is fascinated by how the immune system works in the context of complex microbial communities, and in applying both wet-lab and quantitative biology approaches to these problems.

 

Meet her in the session “What role does the intestinal immune system play in controlling your intestinal microbiota?

Hörsaal F – Plenary Hall
Friday, 9. September, 13:30 – 15:00 CEST

 

… is Professor in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department, School of Chemistry, at UCM.

The major focus for his research group is the study of the role of human dendritic cells in the context of inflammatory diseases, including allergy and infection, to identify potential novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of such diseases. The group is also interested in furthering understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in allergy and Type 2 immune responses, as well as in the development of alternative protocols to identify novel food allergens that allow the improvement of the diagnosis and management of food allergy.

Professor Palomares’ research has so far generated 125 publications in world leading, peer-reviewed international journals and 4 book chapters. He has been invited to participate in more than 100 conferences at national and international meetings and has received 10 awards. He has undertaken the role of Chairperson on more than 50 occasions during scientific sessions and has been involved in the organization of 25 international congresses.

Professor Palomares is a member of the EAACI, AAAAI, SEI and SEBBM societies. He is Executive Committee (ExCom) member of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), Associate Editor of International Archives of Allergy and Immunology and member of the Editorial Boards of Allergy, Clinical & Experimental Allergy and Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of the EAACI Knowledge Hub.

 

 

Meet him in the session “Novel vaccines targeting dendritic cells for allergy and infection

Hörsaal F – Plenary Hall
Friday, 9. September, 13:30 – 15:00 CEST

Inborn Errors of Immunity

 

…graduated as a medical doctor in the laboratory of Prof. Edgar Serfling in the Institute of Pathology at the University Würzburg.

Subsequently he graduated as a doctor of immunology (PhD) in the Laboratory of Prof. Alain Fischer at the Sorbonne University Paris. Based on this he became a scientific immunologist with diagnostic competence of the German Society of Immunology (DGFI). He completed his specialization in Pediatrics and sub-specialization in Pediatric Hematoloy/Oncology/Cell transplantation and habilitated in Pediatrics as an assistant professor on “Etiology, pathophysiology and therapy of primary immunodeficiencies with disordered development and function of the human immune system” at the Dr. von Hauner Children’s Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich.

For a period of eight years, Dr. Hauck is heading the Division of Pediatric Immunology and Rheumatology including the Laboratory of Immunological Diagnostics and the Research Group on Immune Signaling at the Dr. von Hauner Children’s Hospital at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich. With more than 550 patients this is one of the biggest pediatric immunology units in Germany and Europe. Dr. Hauck’s scientific focus is on identifying the etiology and pathophysiology of inborn errors of immunity (IEI) and during the last eight years he has described or was involved in the description of numerous IEI such as IKZF1 gain-of-function (GOF), OAS1 GOF, NBAS1 loss-of-function (LOF), CD137 LOF, CASP8 LOF, IKZF1 dominant-negative (DN), TGFB1 LOF, CARMIL2 LOF, CTPS1 LOF, CORO1A LOF, and LCK LOF.

Since 2021 Dr. Hauck is vice president of the German Speaking Working Party for Pediatric Immunology and member of the clinical working party (CWP) of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID).

 

Meet him in the session “Inborn Errors of Immunity as Trendsetters of Precision Medicine

Hörsaal F – Plenary Hall
Saturday, 10. September, 09:00 – 10:30 CEST


The research focus of the Rizzi Lab is human B-lymphocytes development, maturation and activation in physiological and pathological conditions.

We take advantage of inborn error of immunity such as Fas deficiency to uncover mechanisms of control of B cell maturation and tolerance. In ALPS with Fas deficiency, the Rizzi Lab showed a defect in B cell selection in the germinal center, and discovered a new non-apoptotic function of Fas receptor as molecular switch between the extrafollicular and the germinal center fate in newly activated B cells. The knowledge acquired in in monogenic disorders is then used to understand complex models of autoimmunity.

The Rizzi Lab is expert in in vitro modelling of B cell development and maturation. Studying the dynamic of early B cell development in CVID we discovered a defect in the bone marrow microenvironment, that is unable in supporting B cell maturation. Investigating agammaglobulinemia patients, we recently described Bob1 mutation.

The use of targeted therapies in autoimmune diseases provide a unique opportunity to investigate the impact of specific signalling pathways in human B cell biology. We contributed to the understanding of the consequences of JAK STAT inhibition and of CTLA-4 agonist treatment on B cell function.

 

 

Meet her in the session “B cell fate decisions in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

Hörsaal F – Plenary Hall
Saturday, 10. September, 09:00 – 10:30 CEST

Immunity at Interfaces

… is Professor of Infection Biology at the Medical University of Vienna. Sylvia studied Medicine in Vienna and Berlin, is a board-certified internist and obtained her PhD at the University of Amsterdam.

Her research focuses on the innate immune response to infections in general, focusing specifically on the comprehensive repertoire of macrophage functions in health, development and disease.

Her group discovered the molecular mechanisms linking hemolysis and susceptibility to infections. Her latest research is directed towards the interplay of immune cells regulating lung tissue homeostasis in health and disease.

 

Meet her in the session “Determinants of pulmonary immune homeostasis

Hörsaal A
Saturday, 10. September, 09:00 – 10:30 CEST

 

Associate Professor Joanna Groom is an NHMRC Investigator fellow and laboratory head in the Immunology division of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI). She received her PhD from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research followed by postdoctoral studies at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, where she revealed that directed cell migration into lymphoid niches is intertwined with cell fate and function.

Her current research combines imaging and transcriptional analysis to dissect the cellular interactions that mediate protection against diverse pathogenic infections.

 

 

Meet her in the session “Targeting T cell Interactions for Tailored Immunity

Hörsaal A
Saturday, 10. September, 09:00 – 10:30 CEST

… received her PhD from the University of Strasbourg in 2014 followed by postdoctoral studies at the Institute of Immunology at Hannover Medical School where she revealed adaptive-like anti-viral responses of human γδ T cells.

Since 2020 she is associate professor for Human Systems Immunology within the EXC RESIST (Resolving Infection Susceptibility) at Hannover Medical School.

Her current research employs systems immunology approaches to understand underlying mechanisms guiding the development, adaptation and functionality of γδ and αβ T cells during early life.

 

Meet her in the session “Maturation of innate and adaptive T cells during early life

Hörsaal A
Saturday, 10. September, 09:00 – 10:30 CEST

Adaptive Immunity

… studied biology at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and is now the director of the Institute of Immunology at the University Medical Center (UMC) Mainz and speaker of the Research Center for Immunotherapy at UMC Mainz.

The focus of his work is to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of immunoregulatory processes in immunological microenvironments.

 

Meet him in the session “Context-specific regulation of the tumor microenvironment by regulatory T cells

Hörsaal D
Saturday, 10. September, 09:00 – 10:30 CEST

 A biologist by education, Andreas Radbruch has focused his scientific curiosity on the immune system, and in particular immunological memory, and the way it provides immunity and generates immunopathology. Andreas Radbruch obtained his PhD at the Genetics Institute of the Cologne University, Germany, with Klaus Rajewsky in 1980. He later became Associate Professor there and was a visiting scientist with Max Cooper and John Kearney at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. In 1996, he became Director of the German Rheumatism Research Center in Berlin (DRFZ), now a Leibniz Institute, and in 1998, Professor of Rheumatology at the Charité Medical Center and Humboldt University of Berlin.

Andreas Radbruch has developed a line of research aiming at a cellular and molecular understanding of immune reactions and immunological memory. His research approach is based on the analysis of individual cells, developing and using cutting-edge technologies for cytometry and cell sorting. His lab developed the MACS technology, cytokine cytometry, the cytometric secretion assay, magnetofluorescent liposomes and other tools to analyze fate decisions and imprinting of lymphocytes. He initially focused on the transcriptional regulation of antibody class switch recombination, the shaping of antibody specificity by somatic mutation in B lymphocytes, and the epigenetic imprinting of cytokine gene expression in T lymphocytes. The discovery of long-lived (memory) plasma cells in 1997 initiated a line of research that so far has generated a new understanding of immunological memory, as maintained by functionally imprinted memory plasma cells, and memory B and T lymphocytes, which, as this group has shown, individually reside, rest and survive in niches provided by mesenchymal stromal cells, mostly in the bone marrow, but also in other tissues. Of clinical relevance, memory plasma cells secreting pathogenic antibodies have been recognized as being refractory to conventional therapies and a critical and so far unmet therapeutic target in antibody-mediated diseases. The same is true for memory T lymphocytes driving chronic inflammation, for which the group has identified molecular adaptations and novel therapeutic targets, like the transcription factor Twist1, which dampens pathogenicity and promotes persistence of Th lymphocytes in chronic inflammation.

Andreas Radbruch has received the Carol Nachman Prize for Rheumatology (2011), an Advanced Grant of the European Research Council (ERC, 2011), and the Avery Landsteiner Award (2014). He is a member of the Berlin Brandenburg Academy of Sciences, the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) and the Leopoldina, the German National Academy of Sciences. He has been President of the International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC; 2014-2016), the German Societies for Immunology (2009-2010) and Rheumatology (2007-2008), and the European Federation of Immunological Societies (EFIS; 2019 -2021). He has been the Spokesperson of Section C (Lifesciences) of the Leibniz Association since 2015 and is the current Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Robert Koch Foundation.

 

 

Meet him in the session “A longterm perspective on adaptive immunity

Hörsaal D
Saturday, 10. September, 09:00 – 10:30 CEST

Immune Tolerance

 

Meet him in the session “Macrophages: guardian angels of tissue homeostasis and immune tolerance

Hörsaal F – Plenary Hall
Saturday, 10. September, 11:00 – 12:30 CEST

 

… is Professor of Translational Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy at King’s College London. She received BA and MS degrees in Biochemistry at Rutgers University, USA and a PhD in B cell and IgE immunology at King’s College London under Science and Engineering Research Council and SmithKline Beecham-funded scholarships (1995).

She subsequently developed immunotherapeutic strategies for cancer and inflammatory diseases in academic and biotechnology environments. She was appointed as NIHR/BRC Senior Research Fellow in 2007 and Senior Lecturer in 2013.

Her antibody immunotherapy team studies patient B cells, macrophages, Th2 responses in the cancer context. She designed and translated anti-tumour IgE antibodies from concept to the oncology clinic.

 

 

Meet her in the session “AllergoOncology: IgE class antibodies for cancer immunotherapy

Hörsaal F – Plenary Hall
Saturday, 10. September, 11:00 – 12:30 CEST